mosquito in a small room

feeling for love in everything.



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A beautiful day to love and create

You're invited!

mambubadu:

MAMBU BADU presents

If We Came From Nowhere Here,
Why Can’t We Go Somewhere There?



They Are A Reflection Of You, Sienna Pinderhughes


If We Came From Nowhere Here, Why Can’t We Go Somewhere There? is a photography and video-based exhibit charting journeys into temporality, flux,…

(via yodithinprogress)

love my people. 

vitamin d like shit!!!!!

also, grilling.

mauvevaillance:

shit-gets-real-when:

cooltallguy1202:

eyesofresolute128:

guildhall:

Sweet Lad, Tender Lad

A Pictorial History of Afro-American Gay Couples

Sweet lad, tender lad,
Have no shame, you’re mine for good;
We share a sole insurgent fire,
We live in boundless brotherhood.

I do not fear the gibes of men;
One being split in two we dwell,
The kernel of a double nut
Embedded in a single shell.

(From ‘Imitation of the Arabic’ by Afro-Russian poet, Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin)

Playwright & historian, Trent Kelley, has curated these photographs from his personal collection documenting love and affection among African American gay male couples.  The essay is entitled ‘Hidden in the Open:  A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”

Kelley has written in the Huffington Post:

Afro American same-sex loving gay men who were coupled with one another in the distant past walked the streets, ate at the dinner tables, and generally participated in their larger ethnic community out in the open, their relationships known only to those who were consequential to their everyday lives. In this respect, they were out in the open but hidden to those who didn’t know about their sexual proclivities. Hence, the title of this series of pictures dating from the mid 19th century to the late 20th century is “Hidden in the Open: A Photographic Essay of Afro-American Male Couples.”

Some of these images are sure to depict gay couples, whereas others may not.

The end result is speculative at best, for want in applying a label. Not every gesture articulated between these men is an indication of male-to-male intimacies. Assuredly, what all the photographs have in common are signs of Afro-American male affection and love that were recorded for posterity without fear and shame. Friendships where men often wrote romantically to one another, walked arm in arm were not uncommon to straight and gay men alike during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Depending on economic situation, many even slept together and this may have precluded or included physical intimacy between the sheets.

But there were past generations of Afro American gay men who lived and love bravely. They exist in these photographs. Like today’s gay male of African descent, the majority of them were never victims who whined nor required rescuing. Their presence here defy a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community often wanting to make them an impotent footnote absent of any self-empowerment within gay culture and those vocally homophobic pockets within a black community wanting to write these men out of the narrative to Afro-American history.

See the rest of this outstanding collection here.

 

This is so cool!

i like this !!!!

Amor

Magnifique :)

(via fuckyeahlgbtqblackpeople)

The present moment is really all that we have. The only place you can really love another person is in the present. Love in the past is a memory. Love in the future is a fantasy. To be really alive, love - or any other experience - must take place in the present.

—Jack Kornfield (via cocostudio)

dc-via-chicago:

america-wakiewakie:


There is no African, myself included, who does not appreciate the help of the wider world, but we do question whether aid is genuine or given in the spirit of affirming one’s cultural superiority. My mood is dampened every time I attend a benefit whose host runs through a litany of African disasters before presenting a (usually) wealthy, white person, who often proceeds to list the things he or she has done for the poor, starving Africans. Every time a well-meaning college student speaks of villagers dancing because they were so grateful for her help, I cringe. Every time a Hollywood director shoots a film about Africa that features a Western protagonist, I shake my head — because Africans, real people though we may be, are used as props in the West’s fantasy of itself. And not only do such depictions tend to ignore the West’s prominent role in creating many of the unfortunate situations on the continent, they also ignore the incredible work Africans have done and continue to do to fix those problems.
-Uzodinma Iweala, “Stop Trying to ‘Save’ Africa”


—
Exactly. Let’s be honest about the legacy of colonialism.

and accosted is the right word. 

dc-via-chicago:

america-wakiewakie:

There is no African, myself included, who does not appreciate the help of the wider world, but we do question whether aid is genuine or given in the spirit of affirming one’s cultural superiority. My mood is dampened every time I attend a benefit whose host runs through a litany of African disasters before presenting a (usually) wealthy, white person, who often proceeds to list the things he or she has done for the poor, starving Africans. Every time a well-meaning college student speaks of villagers dancing because they were so grateful for her help, I cringe. Every time a Hollywood director shoots a film about Africa that features a Western protagonist, I shake my head — because Africans, real people though we may be, are used as props in the West’s fantasy of itself. And not only do such depictions tend to ignore the West’s prominent role in creating many of the unfortunate situations on the continent, they also ignore the incredible work Africans have done and continue to do to fix those problems.

-Uzodinma Iweala, “Stop Trying to ‘Save’ Africa”

Exactly. Let’s be honest about the legacy of colonialism.

and accosted is the right word. 

(Source: carried-away)

derica:

THE FUTURE WEIRD: remote control
Wednesday 26th MARCH 2014 @8PM, Spectacle Theater 

The Future Weird is back with REMOTE CONTROL, an evening of films concerning witches & bitches – women who see, take, and sell things they cannot grasp. Whether they wield powers to possess, or are somehow controlled, the technologies these films document are deployed without regard for reciprocity or consent. 

REMOTE CONTROL is both the loss of individual agency, and the thrilling ability to inhabit another’s body. Presenting weird clips alongside shorts by Zina Saro Wiwa, Elaine Castillo, Fyzal Boulifa, and the U.S. Premiere of TOUCH by Shola Amoo, we’re talking possession, surveillance, “brain to brain interface”, and the sinister compulsion to repurpose the humanoid. Join us on Wednesday 26th March @8PM as we contemplate the human of use of human beings.

More details & RSVP via the Facebook event page 

The Future Weird is a screening series dedicated to sci-fi/experimental/weird film by black, African & Third World directors created by Derica Shields & Megan Eardley. Find details of previous programs and follow us here & here

ahh!!!

(via blackfilm)

that minute when you realize this issue that you’re toiling with *in your head * is actually your own shit. and not theirs.

a hard, but liberating truth. 

10 Life Lessons to Excel In Your 30s

not in love with these lists, but this one is good. the majority of this resonated.

all of number 8 - one of the walls i walked into at 29. slowly recalibrating. learning to let uncomfortable spaces/feelings inspire/grow me instead of intimidate.